150 Days of Psalms

For almost a year now I have, on a daily basis, Tweeted a psalm. In my personal devotions I have focused on that psalm for the day, which sometimes has led to other Tweets. The plan has been to work from psalm 1 to psalm 150. I have now done this twice. Some of the Tweets garner more interest than others from those on Twitter. Below I have gathered the top 14 from the last 150. My aim was to sum the most popular in one place, but additionally to pause and reflect on just what I have done in shortening a canonical psalm to a Tweet.

So here they are, along with some brief commentary on some of them.

Psalm 2:
The age to come, and the promise of a messiah at its heart, is a key lens through which to read the book of Psalms.

This Tweet picks up on my personal interest in Psalms 1 and 2 as a purposeful introduction to the Psalter.
Selah

Psalm 6:
Pray for those who can own these words.
Pray that we too will know such confidence in Yahweh during such days and nights.
#psalm6

Sometimes the words of a psalm simply don’t connect with our current situation and feelings. But, psalms of lament like this can help us pray for our brothers and sisters in trouble.
Selah

Psalm 38:
When life makes no sense the psalmist teaches us to plead with Yahweh:
“Do not forsake me my God;
do not be far from me.”

Selah

Psalm 44:
A collective complaint.
Communal lament was done in biblical Israel frequently.
It still has a place in the Church.

The large number of psalms that are laments is a helpful corrective to the false expectations about the ‘life of faith’. The modern church finds it difficult to use communal lament, but it’s a wonderful antidote to the problem of individualism and is a way of growing, and defining what it means to be, a community of God’s people.
Selah

Psalm 46:
Being still before Yahweh & knowing his lordship is more challenging than it sounds.
But in this way we find refuge & strength.

Selah

Psalm 51:
Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity; cleanse me from my sin.
Create in me a clean heart, O God; renew a right spirit in me.

Sometimes words from a psalm seem the best way to capture its essence and sense.
Selah

Psalm 122:
For the sake of the house of Yahweh, our God, let me seek your shalom, O Yerushalayim.
#psalm122 #Psalter

The Psalms of Ascent are very popular. The brevity and strong imagery makes a powerful and memorable impact.
Selah

Psalm 123:
Yahweh, how your servants look to you in need.
We lift our eyes to you.
Grant us grace.
Lord, grant us grace.
#psalm123 #Psalter

This Tweet captures the key imagery of the psalm and mimics the repetitive lilt so often found in the Psalms of Ascent.
Selah

Psalm 126:
The Lord has done great things for us.
For our tears will turn to laughter.
We are children of the dream.
#psalm126 #Psalter

This psalm resonates for me as a promise of blessing for my own church.
Selah

Psalm 127:
Entrust your church to Yahweh in prayer and deed.
For unless the Lord builds the house, we labour in vain.

The longer I journey on the ‘life of faith’ the clearer this becomes to me.
Selah

Psalm 138:
Yahweh is a God to be praised:
He is high above all.
A God who notices His creatures.
Knowing Him completes us.
#psalm138

An attempt to capture the message of the psalm. Caution is needed of course because in the short space of a Tweet we have to miss as much as we capture!
Selah

Psalm 142:
When we feel alone & oppressed we can cling to the truth that one day we will be surrounded by the righteous.

Selah

Psalm 146:
Yahweh is . . .
Creator
Faithful
Just
Provider
Deliverer
Healer
Redeemer
Protector
Father
Judge
King
Eternal
Oh and praiseworthy!

I think this captures what this psalm is about. In the space of one poem/song we have a doctrine on God.
Selah

Psalm 148:
Everything that has breath should praise Yahweh.
Inanimate creation should praise the Lord.
This will happen on His Day.
#Psalter

This psalm has been by far my most popular Tweet. I am not exactly sure why. It’s an attempt to be faithful to the psalm, but it puts a very deliberate interpretation on the psalm.
Selah

Tweeting the psalms is fun, faith building and helpful. However, it can only ever be a pointer back to these canonical songs, poems and prayers.

Author: PsalterMark

Psalm addict, disciple, son, husband, father, academic, theologian, cacti grower, steam enthusiast and ale drinker

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